The Beat of the Butterflies’ Wings

Shrewsbury Museum and Art Gallery invite all ages to be involved in an interactive art and reminiscence exhibition, The Beat of the Butterflies’ Wings,

22nd November 2016– 22nd January 2017

BBW pic

The Beat of the Butterflies’ Wings has been devised by Artist Jill Impey, and support funded by Arts Council England. It has so far involved over 150 participants aged from10-90 years and will continue to develop through performances, talks, workshops and the addition of butterflies to Jill’s Empire Chandelier installation, Prism.

 

The Project considers the 100 years of British involvement in conflict since the First World War: the war to end all wars. It has progressed through a series of 12 initial workshops in Shrewsbury venues including The Redwoods Centre, Coleham School and Participate Contemporary Artspace. Participants aged 10 to 20 years and 65+, have interacted with a 1930’s themed Cabinet of Curiosity, investigating contemporary art works and memorabilia, through performance, drawing, and making origami peace  butterflies. Subsequently, Jill, recorded their stories and expressions of hope for peaceful resolutions to conflict. This sound work, Words about War, Words about Peace now forms part of the exhibition at Shrewsbury Museum and Art Gallery.

 

A further 5 exhibition workshops took place, with artists: Keith Ashford, Jacqui Dodds, Julie Edwards, Eliza Glapinska, and Jill Impey, bringing together a mix of older and younger participants.  They selected objects for the community exhibition cases in Shrewsbury, from the Museum Archive at Ludlow. The group developed printmaking skills to illustrate themes relating to war and peace, explored ideas through text and the juxtaposition of objects. Participants also  provided personal heritage items to add resonance to the display, which has been described as very moving by visitors to the Museum.

 

If you/your organisation would like to visit the exhibition and take part in workshops/talks contact:

Jillimpey.co.uk or visit https://www.facebook.com/TheBeatoftheButterfliesWings/

 

Supporting Organisations: Age UK; Arts for Health, South Staffordshire and Shropshire Healthcare, The Redwoods Centre; Coleham Primary School; Participate Contemporary Artspace CIC; Shrewsbury College; Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery; Ludlow Museum Archive; Shropshire Council.

 

Heavenly Lights Evening Projection

MR projection image
In response to the Heavenly Lights exhibition which celebrates the life and works of Margaret Rope, Andy McKeown will be projecting his Exquisite Fragments images of Margaret Rope’s stained-glass windows onto the front The Music Hall for the second time on Wednesday 21st of December from 4:30pm.  The museum will be staying open until 7:30pm with last entry to the museum at 6:30pm.  Viewing of the projection will be free. However, there will be normal adminsion for charges if you wish to visit the museum.

Poems in the Exhibition

Inspired by the vivid imagination of stained glass artist, Margaret Rope, a local writer – Kate Innes – is creating poems based on the windows, artworks and ephemera in the exhibition.

 

She says:

“The presence of birds, beasts, legends, flowers and the affectionate details of daily life in Margaret Rope’s work, executed with a perfect balance of form and colour, spoke to me. I knew there were many stories just under the surface of the glass, ready to be written.”

 

Poems will be added from time to time. These verses offer another way in to the exhibition. Just as the light made by stained glass inside a church can be seen from different perspectives and in a variable weathers, so the interpretation and appreciation of Margaret Agnes Rope and her work is open to all.

 

Kate Innes trained in Archaeology, Education and Museology before turning to writing full-time. Her novel, The Errant Hours, is set in the Welsh Marches in the thirteenth century.

 

www.kateinneswriter.com

 

Heavenly Lights – The Margaret Rope Exhibition is open until the 15th January, 2017.

 

Saint Winifrede Newport

Art Cafe

ARTS CAFÉ – SHREWSBURY MUSEUM & ART GALLERY

 

The next Arts Café is on Wednesday 14th December, 6.00pm to 8.00pm at the Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery. 

The event will include:

Artist Talk by Nathalie Hildegarde, a stained glass artist who has exhibited nationally and internationally. Nathalie has been successful in securing funding from the Arts Council to make a stained glass window for the Museum. To view her work, please go to: http://www.couleurlive.com/.

Opportunity to look around the ‘Heavenly Lights: The Untold Story of Stained Glass Artist Margaret Agnes Rope’ exhibition and networking.

£3.00 per person, to include refreshments and free access to the exhibition and parts of the museum.

To book a place, please contact Megan Claydon, email: Megan.Claydon@shropshire.gov.uk

Giant stained glass images to be projected on to Museum & Art Gallery

Giant images of stained glass works by Shrewsbury-born artist Margaret Rope will be projected onto the front of the town’s Museum & Art Gallery on the evening of Tuesday 25 October between 7pm and 9pm.

The projection will be the work of international light artist Andy McKeown and is a celebration of the exhibition ‘Heavenly Lights – the untold story of Shrewsbury stained glass artist Margaret Agnes Rope’, which runs at the Museum until 15 January.

On the evening of 25 October the Museum will open late, until 9pm, and there will also be drop-in stained-glass inspired workshops for children with community artist Jamila Walker – offering the chance to make jam-jar lanterns and coloured designs out of straws. The workshops run from 5pm to 9pm and are included within the Museum’s usual admission fee. Parents are invited too.

The workshops will also run on Wednesday 26 October between 10am and 2pm.

Andy McKeown said:

“I have a longstanding passion for stained glass in all its forms and it has featured in a great many of my building illuminations. It is a delight to be able to illuminate Shrewsbury Museum and Art Gallery with fragments and panels from this wonderful exhibition.”

Jamila Walker said:

“The workshops will be accessible, colourful and fun, giving children and their parents the opportunity to create bold simple pieces as well as intricate sculptures and lanterns, all inspired by the vibrant works of Margaret Rope.”

For more information about the celebration event visit www.shrewsburymuseum.org/events.

For more information about Jamila Walker, visit www.jamilawalker.webeden.co.uk.

“Heavenly Lights – The untold story of Shrewsbury stained glass artist Margaret Agnes Rope” is open at Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery until 15 January 2017 but closed on Mondays from October (not including Monday 24 October, which is half-term week).

About Margaret Agnes Rope

Margaret Agnes Rope, born in 1882, produced stained-glass that can be found in churches and cathedrals on three continents, and which is now also collected by American museums – but she is now largely forgotten here in the UK, and even in her home town of Shrewsbury.

Shrewsbury Cathedral window detail med

Margaret Rope’s stained glass window at Shrewsbury Cathedral.

Examples of Margaret Rope’s work can be seen in Shrewsbury (at the town’s Cathedral and at St Mary’s Church) and in churches across the UK, from Suffolk to South Wales to Scotland. Her stained glass windows can also be seen at churches in Australia, South Africa and Rome – and in museums in Los Angeles and New York.

‘Marga’, as she was called, was an instinctive rebel – known for smoking cheroot cigars, riding a motorbike and wearing her hair short – in an era when women had few opportunities to express themselves artistically. Without backing from a patron, rich family or husband, she made her own way in her career, one of a new generation of artists as much at home in a workshop as in a drawing-studio.

Her work – influenced by the ‘Later Arts & Crafts’ style – soon became well-known for its jewelled dazzling colours, its personal stamp, its startling modernism, and its sense of spiritual vibrancy.

Yet, within barely a decade of her first success, she chose to become a Catholic nun, moving into an ‘enclosed’ convent. However, even now, shut away from the world, she continued to work, in a small studio provided by the other nuns.

 

Enjoy ‘A Night at the Museum’ and support Royal Shrewsbury Hospital League of Friends

League of friends

Margaret Rope features on BBC Inside Out West Midlands 26th September

The story of Shrewsbury stained glass artist Margaret Agnes Rope was featured on Inside Out on 26th September. You can see the report here:- http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p0493hfy The programme visits various locations associated with Margaret including Shrewsbury Cathedral, the convent at Quidenham and takes a look at the exhibition at Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery that celebrates her work.

Saint Winifrede Newport

Shropshire’s first recorded hoard of Iron Age coins acquired by Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery

Hoard for twitter

A handful of 2000-year-old precious gold coins are to go on display in Shropshire for the first time on Monday 1st August 2016 after being acquired by Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery.

The seven gold coins date back to AD20-50 and are the first recorded Iron Age coin hoard from Shropshire. They were unearthed in 2015 near Claverley by a group of metal detectorists.

They had been buried just before or after the Roman invasion on the edge of the lands belonging to the Cornovii tribe. Whatever their reason, the person who buried the coins never returned to collect them.

The hoard’s principal finder, Derek Lloyd, said:

“I couldn’t believe my eyes when I found the first coin. It was a bright as the day it was buried.”

Since their discovery the coins have been in the care of the British Museum where they have been studied whilst Shropshire Council’s museums service raised the funds required to purchase them.

Thanks to grants from the V&A/ACE Purchase Grant Fund, Headley Trust, Friends of Shrewsbury Museum and Shropshire Archaeology and History Society, Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery has been given the money necessary to keep this remarkable find in the public domain.

Emma-Kate Lanyon, head of collections for Shropshire Council’s museums service, said:

“Iron Age artefacts from Shropshire are rare and Iron Age coin hoards from the Midlands and Western Britain are very rare indeed. This is the first recorded Iron Age coin hoard from Shropshire and so we wanted to make sure the coins were kept together.

“Over the last twenty years archaeologists and metal detectorists have been working together through the Portable Antiquities Scheme to record such finds and we are learning more about this period of our ancient history all the time.”

Stuart West, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for culture and leisure, said:

“We are extremely grateful for the contributions made by local charities and national bodies to make this purchase. Staff at the museum hope to use the find as a catalyst to develop an exciting new exhibition about the Iron Age as this is a period all our primary school children now study.

“In the meantime, the coins will go on show in the Roman Gallery at Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery alongside several other important Iron Age finds from recent years.”

 

‘Heavenly Lights: The Untold Story of Stained Glass Artist Margaret Agnes Rope’ exhibition comes to Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery this autumn.

Deer hi-res Shrewsbury Cathedral window detail med

A major new exhibition telling the untold story of one of the great female artists of the early twentieth century comes to Shrewsbury this autumn.

Margaret Agnes Rope, born in 1882, produced stained-glass that can be found in churches and cathedrals on three continents, and which is now also collected by American museums – but she is now largely forgotten here in the UK, and even in her home town of Shrewsbury.

Now an exhibition of her work will be staged at Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery from 12 September 2016 to 15 January 2017.

‘Marga’, as she was called, was an instinctive rebel – known for smoking cheroot cigars, riding a motorbike and wearing her hair short – in an era when women were largely suppressed. Without backing from a patron, rich family or husband, she made her own way in her career, one of a new generation of artists as much at home in a workshop as in a drawing-studio.

Her work – influenced by the ‘Later Arts & Crafts’ style – soon became well-known for its jewelled dazzling colours, its personal stamp, its startling modernism, and its sense of spiritual vibrancy.

Yet, within barely a decade of her first success, she chose to become a Catholic nun, moving into an ‘enclosed’ convent. However, even now, shut away from the world, she continued to work, in a small studio provided by the other nuns.

An intensely private person, she left barely any records behind her, and even asked that some of her remaining works be destroyed after her death. Art historians, perhaps frustrated by this lack of information, have since marginalised her achievements.

Shrewsbury Museum & Art Gallery has sought to right this wrong by creating a special project, formed by a group of volunteer archivists, not only to re-research her life and works, but to mount a major exhibition bringing together works and artefacts from all over the country. Many of these works have never been seen in public before. A state of the art projection system will screen giant images of her finest stained-glass windows.

Meanwhile, across her home-town, complementary activities will run alongside the exhibition – from lectures, walks and concerts to the publications of new books about her life and times.

Stuart West, Shropshire Council’s Cabinet member for culture and leisure, said:

“Margaret Rope was one of the greatest stained-glass artists of the early twentieth century, and her works can be seen all over the world.

“Despite her obvious genius, her name is hardly remembered at all; and we hope this exhibition – the first dedicated solely to her work and times – will give her reputation the boost it deserves.

“The Rope family were prominent in Shrewsbury before the Second World War, and many local people may have knowledge, or even memories, of Doctor Rope and his wife and six children – of whom ‘Marga’ was one.

“So, as we prepare and build up to the exhibition, there will be a lot of research and archive-studies into her life and works.”

Anyone with any memories or information about Margaret Rope can email rope2016@gmail.com

 

 

 

New book on sale in our shop – Slow Travel Shropshire

SLOW TRAVEL SHROPSHIRE by Marie Kreft

Published by Bradt Travel Guides £12.99

About this book

With no directly competing titles, Bradt’s Slow Travel Shropshire fills a much-needed gap in the market for a guide to an area that, of all of the UK’s regions, is perhaps most synonymous with ‘Slow’. This new title from Bradt written by local author Marie Kreft places an emphasis on car-free travel, local produce and characterful accommodation. It includes detailed descriptions of place, historical overviews, ghost stories and folk tales, and first-hand accounts from Shropshire locals, as well as hand-picked restaurant recommendations based on long-standing knowledge and consultation with locals. Warm and witty writing combines with a natural enthusiasm for the region making this an indispensable guide to one of Britain’s most scenic areas. Ludlow is acknowledged as the Slow Food capital of the UK, while the region as a whole is much celebrated, described by PG Wodehouse as the “nearest earthly place to paradise”. The guide is unapologetic in taking you the long way round: through ancient woodland, over bridges and ‘Blue Remembered Hills’, back in time, down footpaths, into castles, churches and interesting pubs, cheerfully savouring the authentic, the offbeat and the local.

About the author

Marie Kreft is a former winner of the Bradt / Independent on Sunday travel-writing competition. She lives in Birmingham, a short hop from Shropshire to where she and her family escape at weekends for long walks and big dinners. Marie loves camping, real ale, old music, new theatre, cooking, backpacking, rail travel, secondhand books, odd historical facts, vintage shops, and spending time with her husband and son – who have helped her to slow down and enjoy the little things in life.

Contents

Going Slow in Shropshire, Chancel encounters, Revered hedgehogs & beloved bugs, Festivals & fairs, Shropshire as inspiration, A taste of Shropshire, Geology, Planning your visit.

How this book is arranged:

1 South Shropshire – Getting there & around, Ludlow & Bromfield, Craven Arms to the Clun Valley, From the Stiperstones to the Welsh border, Around Church Stretton & the Long Mynd, The Clee Hills & Corvedale to Cleobury Mortimer

2 Southeast Shropshire – Getting there & around, Bridgnorth & around, South of Bridgnorth & the Severn Valley, Much Wenlock, Staffordshire borders

3 Ironbridge Gorge & The Wrekin – Getting there & around, Around the Ironbridge Gorge World Heritage Site, Telford, Wellington, The Weald Moors to Newport

4 Shrewsbury & Mid Shropshire – Getting there & around, Shrewsbury, North & east of Shrewsbury, Towards South Shropshire

5 Oswestry & Northwest Shropshire – Getting there & around, Oswestry & around, Whittington & north of Oswestry, Maesbury & south of Oswestry

6 North Shropshire – Getting there & around, Ellesmere & Shropshire’s ‘Lake District’, Towards Shrewsbury, Wem to Whitchurch, Market Drayton & around Accommodation Index